YPN Magazine Circa 2006


 

For several years this was the official website for the Young People Now magazine, the only dedicated magazine for professionals working with young people. Launched in 2007, Children & Young People Now is the result of the merging of Children Now, which was produced in association with the National Children's Bureau, and its sister magazine Young People Now.

To learn more about the magazine Children & Young People Now and its website go to: CYPNow.co.uk.

Content on this page is from the Young People Now magazine's 2006 archived pages providing just a glimpse of what this site offered its readership.

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"Young People Now has announced the winners of its second annual Positive Images Awards. The awards, which are open to youth groups, young people, local authorities and media outlets, aim to celebrate positive portrayals of young people in the media, and proactivity among youth groups and councils in promoting affirmative images of young people."


This year’s winners of Positive Images Awards are:

Best involvement by a young person in promoting positive media portrayal
Ashanti Fearon
Ashanti became a mother when she was 16. She faced a hostile media to raise awareness of the challenges faced by teenage mothers, as part of YWCA’s Respect Young Mums campaign

Best publicity campaign by a youth group
Connexions Cheshire and Warrington
The five young people of Connexions’ Young People’s Reference Group led a postcard campaign to promote Connexions that was supported by 11 other partnerships; they also wrote letters to newspapers and MPs and were interviewed by the media

Most youth-friendly local council
Lancashire County Council
Lancashire has appointed 16-year-old Arif Khan as Youth Ambassador and is holder of the Assembly of European Region’s Most Youth-friendly Region in Europe. It runs numerous participation and youth projects

Best magazine produced by young people for young people
Zeal
At least 25,000 young people read each copy of Zeal, which is produced by a core team of 10 teenagers in Essex. The young people also produce a web site.

Best local press coverage
Evening Chronicle, Newcastle
The Evening Chronicle launched Young Achiever Awards, now in their fifth year, to highlight young people who achieve success

Best national press
CosmoGIRL!
The teen magazine’s CosmoGIRL of the year 2005 featured young women such as 15-year-old Josie Vallely, who has campaigned and fundraised for various charities over three years

Best radio coverage of young people
BBC Radio Merseyside/ BBC Merseyside Bus Team
The BBC Bus on Merseyside has let young people between the ages of 11 and 25 tell their own stories since August 2003

Best TV coverage of young people
Young Black Farmers/Channel 4
This three-part series followed “the UK’s only Black farmer” as he took in nine urban young people, many of whom had a negative attitude to the countryside, to see if they could hack it as farmers

Best online coverage of young people
BBC Blast Young Reporters Scheme
Blast aims to build confidence in teenagers through creativity. Young people worked alongside BBC Where I Live to create a Blast section on its local web site

 


OVERALL AIM
Young People Now is campaigning to improve the portrayal of young people in the media.
 

SPECIFIC AIMS

  • To encourage the media to look for positive angles when reporting stories about young people
  • To incentivise youth groups and young people to be proactive in contacting the media
  • To create a press code, in consultation with young people, youth groups and the media, that will help to give young people a voice on issues that affect them
  • To ensure that local councils make the attempt to celebrate young people as part of a long-term strategy

Yobs, thugs, louts, monsters, scum, brutes, crooks. Just some of the terms used to refer to young people in the media in the last few years. The media presents young people at best as problems and at worst as criminals: 71 per cent of stories about them are negative and one in three focus on crime.

The majority of young people are not criminals. Just seven per cent of young people in school have been committed crimes requiring police involvement. But when news coverage of productive and law-abiding young people is the exception rather than the rule, public opinion and policy tends to target young people en masse, with measures such as curfews and the ability to move on young people who are perceived as a threat. Young people are stereotyped and marginalised.

The media needs to take responsibility and find ways of giving young people a voice on issues that affect them, or risk alienating them as both consumers and members of society. Research carried out for Young People Now found that teenagers feel that newspapers disapprove of young people, and don’t contain anything of relevance to them. This is not surprising when young people are only quoted in eight per cent of stories about them.

But it’s not just the media. The trend of referring to young people as yobs and louts is also part of Government language. Press releases from the Home Office refer to “new tools to tackle yobs” and “fighting back against louts”. No surprise that resulting coverage takes the same tone.

Steve Barrett, editor of Young People Now magazine, says: “We know that young people are doing many positive and productive things, from giving up their time to teach asylum seekers literacy skills in Kent to creating school bus anti-bullying schemes in Wales. Of course some young people commit crimes, but the majority of them are law-abiding. The wall-to-wall coverage of teenage gangs and violent criminals risks stigmatising a whole generation, leading to catch-all policies which discriminate against the vast majority of young people who are just getting on with growing up.

“Young People Now would like to see the media take a more balanced line when it comes to portraying young people. If young people are not given the opportunity to comment on issues that reflect them, the media will not present an unbalanced picture but will continue to haemorrhage young consumers and readers. That is why we are working with young people and the media to create a code of practice, and why we are launching a set of awards to encourage positive images of young people in the media.”

YOUNG PEOPLE AND THE MEDIA: THE FACTS

  • One in three articles about young people are about crime (Young People and the Media, Mori). 26 per cent of young people in school admit to committing a crime but only seven per cent of that group have committed crimes leading to police involvement (Mori/ YJB)
  • 71 per cent of press stories about young people are negative and only 14 per cent are positive (Young People and the Media, Mori)
  • Young people are only quoted in eight per cent of stories about them (Young People and the Media, Mori)
  • Two-thirds of 11-18 year olds would not trust a journalist to tell them the truth (Mori/ Nestle Family Monitor 2003)
  • Young people see the press as finger-wagging and authoritarian, telling them what they “should and shouldn’t be doing” They also see journalists as prone to exaggeration. “They’ll get anything to put in there if they’re short of something to write. They don’t care if it hurts someone’s reputation.” said one young person
  • 90 per cent of youth workers believe that tabloid newspapers give a negative impression or very negative impression of young people. 69.2 per cent believe local papers are negative or very negative, and 61.5 per cent think broadsheets are negative or very negative. (Young People Now reader survey 2004)
  • 93 per cent of youth workers believe that youth groups should be more proactive in promoting positive stories about young people, while 41 per cent say that young people should be taught media literacy and campaigning. (Young People Now reader survey 2004)
  • Young people were referred to as thugs 26 times and yobs 21 times in a survey of 74 tabloid and broadsheet articles about young people and crime. Other descriptors included evil, lout, monsters, brutes, scum, menace, heartless, sick, menacing and inhuman. (Shape the Debate campaign, 2002 - 2003)

CONTACT US
Have you had experience of negative media coverage? Or would you like to highlight positive media experiences?

 



NEWS

 

Connexions: Government spells out end for Connexions Card
By Tom Lloyd - 14/06/06                   
The Government is to "wind down" the Connexions Card scheme, which allows young people to earn points that can be exchanged for rewards.

Young people can earn points until the end of August and redeem them until February 2007.Youth minister Beverley Hughes said the scheme, run by outsourcing company Capita, has "served its purpose" following the roll-out of the education maintenance allowance and youth opportunity card plans.

But many in the sector feel the card has been a failure. Last year an independent evaluation showed less than four per cent of 16- to 19-year-olds used the cards.

Steve Stewart, executive director of Connexions Coventry and Warwickshire, said: "In the West Midlands Capita's service was appalling, and the card had a negligible impact on young people."

Capita said the end of the scheme was the result of a Department for Education and Skills (DfES) decision, and it expects to receive compensation.

It was appointed to run the scheme for seven years from 2001, in a deal worth over £100m.

Capita has received £65.1m for the first five years of the project.

The DfES said all terms were under negotiation, and it expects to make an overall saving from the early closure of the scheme.

www.dfes.gov.uk


Youth Matters: Opportunity card pilots could be delayed by banking issues
By Emily Rogers - 14/06/06              
Implementation of the 10 opportunity card pilots is likely to slip into early next year because of difficulties in finding a suitable banking solution, Young People Now has learned.

The pilots, which were announced at the launch of Youth Matters: Next Steps earlier this year (YPN, 15-21 March, p3), were scheduled to start in September, building on the Government's Connect scheme, which provides a shared infrastructure to enable local authorities to provide online services.

But Young People Now understands the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) is in talks with a national bank to provide an alternative way of transferring money to the cards, sparking fears among pilots that this could reduce the card's accessibility for young people.

David McWilliams, head of youth services at Nottingham City Council, one of the pilot authorities, said: "This could put further barriers in front of young people and the DfES is very aware of that."

McWilliams said pilot authorities were concerned about possible hurdles presented by bank administration, such as a req-uirement on young people to apply for the cards before they can be activated and to travel to a bank to top cards up with cash.

DfES officials and participation authorities will be meeting this week to discuss the most likely start dates for the pilots.

"Over the past three weeks, things have started to wane a bit, because we don't want to keep investing time and money if we don't know what the outcome will be," said McWilliams. "In the East Midlands, we need a six-month lead in."

But a DfES spokeswoman said: "We are talking to a number of people about how we are going to make the scheme work. We are still working towards the autumn as a start date."

Liverpool, another area that will pilot the cards, says the free leisure scheme it introduced in May increased leisure centre attendance by 17 per cent in the first month.


Youth Services: London providers take action to enforce service consistency
By Emily Rogers - 14/06/06              
London's regional youth work unit says it will look into developing a "pan-London youth offer", following a number of initiatives to improve consistency in work with young people across the capital.

Alison Williams, director of organisational development for Prospects, which runs services in 16 London boroughs, highlighted the need for a "standard core offer" for young Londoners at a conference last week. "We need to be consistent across the boroughs in the resources and priorities of the services that young people receive," she said.

Regional youth work unit Partnership for Young London has unveiled a "wish list" for London's youth support workforce, setting out components of a shared training strategy.

Helen Hibbert, regional co-ordinator of the partnership, said: "We'd be happy to explore a pan-London youth offer. It's consistent with ideas of the Summer Uni London and makes sense strategically."

Summer Uni London (SUL), which offers free summer activities to eight-to 25-year-olds across the capital, launched last week. It is run by the Tower Hamlets Summer University, and 10 boroughs have so far formed an activity providers network under the SUL brand.

The Department for Education and Skills has provided £1m over two years to enable a team of seven to co-ordinate SUL, and £33,000 each to 32 London boroughs, an amount that each borough is expected to match.

www.summerunilondon.org


Play: SkillsActive unveils national strategy for play
By Emily Rogers - 14/06/06              

Sector skills council SkillsActive publishes the first UK-wide strategy for the play workforce today (14 June).

The strategy sets out a 10-year vision for the profession and a five-year plan for the development of play work education, training and skills.

It sets out how play work can be developed into a profession acknowledged as central to provision for children and young people by 2016, by developing education, training and qualifications for an estimated 130,000 play workers.

Aims of the strategy include the establishment of the first professional body for play work, with a registration system for workers, which the council hopes to launch early next year.

Paul Bonel, the council's director of play work, said: "This will give a credibility factor to the sector and, hopefully, employers will see this as an important way of ensuring minimum standards."

The strategy also sets out plans to secure national terms and conditions on a par with other children's workforce professionals, and to develop a qualifications framework for the sector, based on a set of national occupational standards.

It aims to secure resources for training and education centres in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, to replicate the nine already set up in each of the English regions.

Bonel said that the strategy would be used as a reference document for the council, as well as a campaigning tool to boost sector resources.

"The profile of play work has improved enormously over the past 10 years, but we still have a way to go," he added.

SkillsActive, which represents roles including sports development workers, fitness instructors and oupoor education workers, is working to deliver the strategy with organisations including Play Wales, PlayBoard Northern Ireland and Play Scotland.

The strategy is being launched at the House of Commons today at a meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Play.

In England, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport will publish a report this summer setting out the Government's vision. The National Assembly for Wales published its play strategy earlier this year. In Northern Ireland, the Office of the First Minister and other groups are developing a national play policy.

www.skillsactive.com.


Volunteering: Jewish brigade to launch young volunteers project
By Dipika Ghose - 14/06/06              
The Jewish Lads' and Girls' Brigade is revamping its youth volunteering programme to attract under-14s.

In September the organisation will launch JLGB Volunteers, a rethink of its Big Lottery-funded Hand-in-Hand project for 14- to 25-year-olds, funding for which ran out in December last year.

The scheme, aimed at young people in the organisation and in Jewish schools, will include a 10-hour volunteering award for eight-to 11-year-olds and a 25-hour award for 11- to 14-year-olds, which will promote citizenship and train young people in skills such as sign language.

A 50-hour Young Citizens award is already available for 14- to 15-year-olds. When young people reach 16 they will feed into the organisation's Millennium Volunteers scheme. The awards will be accredited by the brigade. Neil Martin, chief executive of the brigade, said it is seeking funding for the awards: "Our Hand-in-Hand scheme was so successful that we decided to rebrand it and incorporate our Millennium Volunteers scheme. We are targeting younger people."

The brigade is a national uniformed organisation with senior (11- to 18-year-old) and junior (eight- to 11-year old) groups.

 www.jlgb.org               


Skateboarding: The Flip Side

By ZOE BROCK, 16, LONGWELL - 14/06/06

Skateboarding is hugely popular among young people, especially for young men, Paul Humphries finds out how projects are using the sport to introduce teenagers to other activities.

Dan Lacey, 18, never thought attending a skateboard session at a youth centre would have such an influence on his life. But two years after attending his first session at Cadbury Heath Youth Centre in South Gloucestershire, Dan is adamant the club has changed the way he looks at things.

"I initially went along to hang around with the skateboarding crowd and keep off the streets," says Dan. "But then I started to take notice of the other activities going on and began taking part. I like the arty stuff, such as spray tattoos, but there's also the chance to learn more practical skills like driving."

For Cathy Gane, the youth centre manager at Cadbury Heath, Dan's story is not unusual. She often finds that the skateboarders are more than willing to take part in other sessions once they've been enticed inside. "The idea is to be fun but educational and young people appreciate that," she says. "We try to ensure that whatever we do is going to have a positive effect."

The Wednesday night skateboarding sessions began more than two years ago after young people expressed an interest in setting up a skatepark.

A dedicated night was introduced within the youth centre where the young people could come to skate and discuss how they would go about getting a permanent oupoor park established.

Staff at the centre worked with the young people to plan the new facility and raise funds. Eventually, enough money was raised to build an oupoor park in nearby Warmley Forest.

Realising it had tapped a rich vein of potential interest, the centre decided to keep the indoor sessions going and today up to 30 young people aged 12 to 19 attend each week. Youth worker Martin James says: "If it wasn't for skateboarding, we'd have never made contact with these young people."

Sessions with the skateboarders have covered environmental issues such as Greenpeace, Fairtrade, the effects of skateboarding on the environment and basic first aid.

The key, says James, has been to relate the programme to the sport: "Once the young people get used to having things to do other than skateboarding all night, you can provide sessions on things such as sexual health."

Off the streets

In Manchester, Projekts MCR has set up a skatepark in the Northern Quarter of the city. The skatepark was established two years ago to attract young people away from the streets and into an environment where they could practise their skating safely. Although located near to the Ardwick area of Manchester where two teenage boys were shot a couple of weeks ago, most young people who attend come from the more affluent, suburban parts of the city.

John Haines, Projekts MCR's skatepark manager, says: "We have about 25 skaters a night but could easily attract more if we had the space."

The project has a Christian ethos and three of the full-time workers are practising Christians, but it isn't overtly evangelical. "The young people mainly come to skate so we don't want to put them off by talking about God," says Haines.

Facilities at the skatepark are quite limited, but the ultimate aim is to provide a state-of-the-art centre with a chill-out zone, youth cafe and space for external youth agencies. Haines says: "We offer young people what advice we can but we really want to employ a full-time youth worker who will be able to work more closely with them."

Haines believes that the project is missing out on a valuable opportunity by not providing a range of youth services onsite. He says: "We realise that we could be offering a great deal more to these young people if we expanded the project."

YOUNG PEOPLE'S VOICES

I really like the arty stuff. I started coming down here nearly two years ago, at first for the skateboarding, but now we're all into other things as well

ALEX BAKER, 14, BRISTOL

I'm getting into the other things. I'm learning how to do hand massage and it's amazingly relaxing

AARON PARSONS, 14, BRISTOL

Me and my friends were attracted to the centre by the boys skateboarding.

But now I'm into the arts and crafts sessions and find learning about things like healthy eating interesting

 



Youth Matters: Opportunity card pilots could be delayed by banking issues

By Emily Rogers - 14/06/06

Implementation of the 10 opportunity card pilots is likely to slip into early next year because of difficulties in finding a suitable banking solution, Young People Now has learned.

The pilots, which were announced at the launch of Youth Matters: Next Steps earlier this year (YPN, 15-21 March, p3), were scheduled to start in September, building on the Government's Connect scheme, which provides a shared infrastructure to enable local authorities to provide online services.

But Young People Now understands the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) is in talks with a national bank to provide an alternative way of transferring money to the cards, sparking fears among pilots that this could reduce the card's accessibility for young people.

David McWilliams, head of youth services at Nottingham City Council, one of the pilot authorities, said: "This could put further barriers in front of young people and the DfES is very aware of that."

McWilliams said pilot authorities were concerned about possible hurdles presented by bank administration, such as a req-uirement on young people to apply for the cards before they can be activated and to travel to a bank to top cards up with cash.

DfES officials and participation authorities will be meeting this week to discuss the most likely start dates for the pilots.

"Over the past three weeks, things have started to wane a bit, because we don't want to keep investing time and money if we don't know what the outcome will be," said McWilliams. "In the East Midlands, we need a six-month lead in."

But a DfES spokeswoman said: "We are talking to a number of people about how we are going to make the scheme work. We are still working towards the autumn as a start date."

Liverpool, another area that will pilot the cards, says the free leisure scheme it introduced in May increased leisure centre attendance by 17 per cent in the first month.

 


Crisis intervention: A Place to Call Home

By - 14/06/06

Young people with complex needs often struggle in traditional foster care, Sally Flood looks at the specialist centres that step in and make a difference.

Sarah was 14 when she was placed in the crisis intervention centre at Bryn Melyn, north Wales. After a series of violent family arguments, Sarah was taken into foster care, but her heavy drug use caused a series of placements to break down.

At Bryn Melyn, Sarah was allocated a team of three practitioners, who helped her consider the reasons why she used drugs. Over the course of six months, Sarah had weekly sessions with a psychologist and regular access to the local youth health team. She also took part in a range of activities, from tenpin bowling to playing team sports. The aim was to help Sarah improve her self-confidence and communication skills, and enable her to return to a traditional foster care placement.

Life-changing

The approach seems to be successful. Since leaving the centre two months ago, Sarah has completed some formal education and is now about to start a part-time job. Sarah attributes the turnaround to her time at Bryn Melyn: "At first, I really resented everyone and wanted to go home," she says.

"But the staff at the centre made me want to change my life."

Crisis intervention centres provide a refuge for more than 1,000 young people in the UK who are not able to remain in a foster care or other residential placement. Typically, these are the most damaged and traumatised young people, who display extremely challenging behaviour that requires one-to-one attention from qualified carers. The young people may have been abused, be dependent on alcohol or drugs, or be suffering from conditions such as attention deficient hyperactivity disorder or Asperger's syndrome.

Most of the young people in crisis intervention centres are referred by local authorities or social services, and placements are funded by a combination of social services - sometimes via youth services - local health authorities and education authorities. "We're offering something that the local authority itself can't offer," explains Emma Brady, a child practitioner at Five Rivers, which operates a number of crisis intervention centres across the UK.

Brady is currently working with one young person who couldn't successfully be placed in conventional local authority foster or residential care.

Katie, 15, has been in care several times before, but those placements broke down and she is now staying at Five Rivers' crisis intervention centre near Weymouth (see box). "I was in foster care when I was 12 but it didn't go to well," explains Katie. "My foster parents accused me of taking drugs when I wasn't, and we got into loads of rows about it."

Katie was then placed in a children's home, but returned home after she accused a male member of staff of abusing her. However, things soon deteriorated when Katie's brother began beating her for money to buy drugs.

The final straw came when Katie's mother refused to buy her cigarettes: "She'd paid for them before and I was addicted to nicotine, and she suddenly stopped," she says. Katie soon worked out how to pay for her own cigarettes - using a text dating service to pick up men who she slept with for money.

"It was just easy to find blokes and sleep with them - my mum knew about it," she recalls. "But it was only when the social services found out that it all kicked off and I got taken into emergency care again."

The aim of crisis intervention centres is to help young people like this to return to something like a normal life, says Jeanette Young, managing partner of Little Islands, which operates a number of residential centres for young people usually aged between 11 and 17. "We're dedicated to helping young people get their lives back on track," she says. "Most centres use a holistic approach, offering a combination of activities, education, therapy and vocational training."

Little Islands' facilities tend to be located within urban settings, since the agency believes this is the most effective way to prepare young people for a return to their communities. As they progress, young people are encouraged to attend local colleges and gain additional vocational or academic qualifications; some young people also hold down part-time jobs in local shops, stores and cafes.

Five Rivers' centre near Weymouth is next door to an outdoor education centre and young people staying there frequently make use of the activities on offer. But the emphasis remains on trying to emulate family life by placing young people in solo or dual placements with two key workers in regular family houses.

Other centres, such as Bryn Melyn, focus strongly on therapy, providing intensive treatment and support for young people who can't be cared for anywhere else.

Because of the challenging nature of some of the young people's conditions, the professionals sometimes have to take a liberal approach to discipline when working with the young people. In the past, this has led to problems with the local community, says Lorraine Giles, director of care at The Ryes School, which specialises in caring for young people who have serious special educational needs and mental or neurological disorders. "There are times when we allow behaviour or language that might not normally be considered acceptable, and observers were extremely critical or nervous of that," she says. "But it's not like there are no boundaries - we do make very clear to young people that there's a world of difference between damage to property and damage to other people."

But perhaps the biggest challenge for crisis intervention professionals is being realistic about outcomes, adds Young. "We obviously try to link back to Every Child Matters but, more importantly, we ask if we've taught someone how to live in society," she says. For example, in some cases a young person won't get a GCSE qualification but the centre might have taught them to read and write well enough to open a bank account. Young adds: "That is a successful outcome to me."

Savour every victory

Brady echoes the sentiment that successful outcomes for young people in crisis intervention cannot usually be measured by academic attainment.

"Often people come to us in a complete whirlwind so we aim to teach them how to make connections with people, how to communicate their feelings, and perhaps look at their future positively," she says. "We're focusing on teaching young people how to develop and maintain relationships so that, if they have problems in later life, they're able to cope better."

Some names and details have been changed

KATIE'S CARE PLAN

From the outside, Five Rivers' crisis intervention centre near Weymouth looks just like a regular bungalow. But this centre has provided a safe haven for some of the country's most difficult and traumatised teenagers.

Current resident Katie is 15 years old and was taken into care two months ago after her social workers discovered that she had been prostituting herself to pay for cigarettes. When Katie arrived at the centre, she was allocated a team of four carers who have some experience of working with teenage girls with complex needs.

During her six-month stay, the aim is to provide Katie with emotional support, but also to give her some sense of structure and boundaries that will help her to be placed in conventional foster care, explains Emma Brady, a childcare practitioner at Five Rivers.

Giving young people structure in their lives forms an essential part of the centre's work, so Katie's week is carefully timetabled.

Chance of stability

Staff will wake her in the morning, and the first task is to ensure that Katie makes her bed and tidies her bedroom. After breakfast, one of the staff usually takes Katie to the local school she attends. In the evenings, Katie has a combination of therapy and supervised activities. Since the centre is situated next to an outdoor education centre, Katie has the opportunity to take part in a range of outdoor sports, from quad biking to abseiling and archery. This gives her a chance to experience a feeling of success that may be lacking elsewhere in her life, and helps to provide her with an outlet for some of her energy, explains Brady.

During half term, the rules are relaxed slightly and Katie is allowed to go out on visits with staff members. "Katie gets to choose where she wants to go," explains Brady. "So we've done things like bowling and a day out to Monkey World. They might seem like treats, but it's a way to get her used to being in the community again." Some names and details have been changed

FIND OUT MORE

THE RYES SCHOOL provides therapeutic care for young people aged between seven and 24. The school specialises in working with young people with special educational needs and extreme or challenging behaviour, including autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. www.theryesschool.org.uk 01787 374998 Five Rivers Specialises in providing safe placements for young people who have been abused or are viewed to be in need of specialist care.

www.five-rivers.org 0800 389 8708

LITTLE ISLANDS Specialises in supporting 11- to 17-year-olds with a history of challenging behaviour, substance misuse and mental health-related problems.

www.littleislands.co.uk 01684 291349

BRYN MELYN provides therapeutic care and treatment programmes for young people who are experiencing severe difficulties and disturbances in their lives. www.brynmelyngroup.com 01678 530330.

 



EVENTS DIARY

 

June 2006
 
National Volunteers Week
01 June 2006 - 07 June 2006
Location:
 
Volunteers' Week (1-7 June) is the UK's annual celebration of the work volunteers do. During the Week events are held across the country to recognise, reward and recruit volunteers. This web site provides a range of tools and resources to help you celebrate Volunteers' Week and the contribution that your volunteers have made.
 
 
Understanding mental health and well-being
02 June 2006
Location: Dundee
 
An opportunity to share experiences and discuss issues of common concern for those working with children and young people. Contact: 0131 228 8484 www.childreninscotland.org.uk
 
 
Essential Skills in Sexual Health Training
06 June 2006 - 08 June 2006
Location: Cardiff
 
A course for developing competence and confidence in the design, development, delivery and evaluation of sexual health training, with a focus on training skills and not sexual health knowledge. Contact: 020 7923 5235 www.fpa.org.uk
 
 
Welfare Benefits for 16 to17 year-olds
06 June 2006
Location: London
 
An introductory course which aims to give participants an overview of the benefits system in relation to young people, and to enable them to give basic advice on common benefits. Contact: 020 7490 6720 www.shelter.org.uk/training
 
 
Anger management: working with young people
09 June 2006
Location: Dundee
 
Methods for helping young people to understand and manage their own anger. Contact: 0131 228 8484 www.childreninscotland.org.uk
 
 
Postnatal Depression in Teenagers
13 June 2006
Location: Peterborough
 
This workshop aims to list the symptoms exhibited by those experiencing baby blues, postnatal depression or puerperal psychosis and suggest suitable non-medical treatment strategies and identify reasons why younger parents are especially vulnerable to postnatal depression. 020 8993 3441 www.nct.org.uk
 
 
Drugs, Alcohol and Social work - Delivering Solutions
14 June 2006
Location: Birmingham
 
A one day conference for social workers whose clients are not primarily drugs and alcohol users, but who may be affected by substance misuse. Contact: 020 7261 8400 www.coievents.co.uk/solutions.html
 
 
Creative approaches to young people with sexually concerning behaviour
14 June 2006 - 16 June 2006
Location: Edinburgh
 
Developing techniques for young people who present sexually concerning behaviour - which may range from young people making themselves sexually vulnerable to exhibiting sexually aggressive behaviour - through the use of basic drama, roleplay, body awareness work, art work and photographs, mask techniques and the development of metaphor. Contact: 0131 228 8484 www.childreninscotland.org.uk
 
 
Anger Management Groupwork Interventions with Young People
15 June 2006
Location: Leicester
 
This seminar will examine methods, challenges and opportunities presented through groupwork with young people with anger problems, and will disseminate new work developed for the UK Youth Young Male Mind Track Programme. Contact: 0113 267 5478 acumentraining@hotmail.com
 
 
Self-harm in young people
15 June 2006
Location: Borders
 
A look at all aspects of self-harm including parasuicide, suicide and self-injury. Contact: 0131 228 8484 www.childreninscotland.org.uk
 
 
Families, fathers and fatherhood
15 June 2006
Location: Glasgow
 
A conference to consider the policy and practice environment in relation to fatherhood issues. Contact: 0131 222 2446 www.childreninscotland.org.uk
 
 
Family Resettlement and Tenancy Sustainment
15 June 2006
Location: Manchester
 
A course exploring good practice issues relating to resettlement and tenancy sustainment services for families, with particular relevance to the requirements of the Homelessness Act 2002. Contact: 020 7490 6720 www.shelter.org.uk/training
 
 
Bike Week
17 June 2006 - 25 June 2006
Location:
 
A nationwide 'celebration of cycling'.
 
 
Child Safety Week
19 June 2006 - 25 June 2006
Location:
 
Raising awareness of the causes of childhood accidents and encouraging effective action to reduce the high toll of death and injury.
 
 
Working creatively with challenging young people
19 June 2006 - 21 June 2006
Location: Edinburgh
 
An intensive course, using drama and theatre techniques in youth and education work as an active and exciting way of engaging young people in creative and issue based work including communication skills, self-esteem, confronting offending behaviour and community development. Contact: 0131 228 8484 www.childreninscotland.org.uk
 
 
Essential Skills in Sexual Health Training
20 June 2006 - 22 June 2006
Location: London
 
A course for developing competence and confidence in the design, development, delivery and evaluation of sexual health training, with a focus on training skills and not sexual health knowledge. Contact: 020 7923 5235 www.fpa.org.uk
 
 
Delivering Better Outcomes: Outcome Management
22 June 2006
Location: London
 
A seminar to improve the skills and confidence of senior managers who commission public services such as health, offender management and social care. Contact: 020 8675 5777 www.publicinnovation.org.uk
 
 
Deafblind Awareness Week
26 June 2006 - 02 June 2006
Location:
 
A great opportunity to raise public awareness about issues facing people who live with deafblindness.

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